Pathologists in training information

 

 

Events of Interest for Pathologists-in-Training

 

Specialty Conference:   Leadership, Collaboration And Change In Health Care: A Resident’s Workshop For Essential Skills”

Date:               Saturday, March 1

Time:              12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Where:           CC 28 DE

 

Course Directors:

Carol Farver MD, MS, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

Phyllis Huettner, MD, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO

James K. Stoller MD, MS, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

 

Course Description:

The delivery of health care in today’s world is increasingly complex. Historically, medical training has centered exclusively on developing clinical and research competence in the medical sciences. However, as healthcare is being delivered more and more by integrated teams and organizations, medical education must teach physicians core competencies of working in and leading healthcare organizations. This workshop is designed to educate residents in leadership, collaboration and communication in healthcare organizations. The course syllabus and bibliography are developed from studies specific to the health care industry that focus on the role of leadership and the functioning of teams within healthcare organizations. The workshop will serve as an introduction to these concepts and an extensive bibliography for further reading will be provided.

The curriculum will provide an opportunity for residents to undertake a guided exploration of the following areas of study below, and upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Define the characteristics of effective leaders in health care

•Use emotional intelligence

•Discuss the importance of mentoring and time management in career success

•Understand the characteristics and importance of effective teams in health care

•Administer basic theories on how to change and improve organizations

•Develop basic tools to manage conflict

 

12:00 PM      Leadership and Collaboration in Health Care: The Tools Physicians Need to Lead

Carol Farver MD, MS, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

James K. Stoller MD, MS, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Define emotional intelligence and the evidence for its importance in leadership

•Discuss the important physician competencies needed to lead healthcare organizations

•Define the models of organizational change

•Review examples of change management in health care organizations

 

1:15 PM The New Physician Leader: Basic Survival Skills

Phyllis Huettner, MD, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Define models of time management

•Define effective tools to improve one’s own time management

•Summarize the basic elements of a mentoring network and its importance in career success

 

2:45 PM         Break

 

3:00 PM        Building an Effective Health Care Team

James K. Stoller MD, MS, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Review the importance of teams in health care

•Define characteristics of effective health care teams

•Summarize and reflect on one’s own role in a team

 

4:45 PM         Identifying and Resolving Conflict: Effective Tools for Tomorrow’s Leaders

Carol Farver MD, MS, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Review the types of conflict

•Complete a standard inventory on how one handles conflict

•List tools for conflict resolution

•Discuss case scenarios of conflict that residents experience

 

5:45 PM         Wrap-up and Evaluations

 

NOTE:  Due to the high demand for this conference you must check in at the meeting location 10 minutes before the start of the class.  Unoccupied seats will be given to those not registered but waiting to attend.

 

Insider’s Tip:  There’s a reception following this conference for Pathologists in Training, USCAP Board Members,  and Ambassadors – but you must attend the Conference to obtain entry.   Held in CC 28 A the Reception runs from 6:00 to 7:30.

 

 

Special Workshop:  Genomic Medicine for Pathologists: What You Need to Know”

 

Date:               Saturday, March 1  

Time:              9:00 AM – 5:00 PM           

Where:           CC  28C

 

Course Director:

Richard Haspel, MD, PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

 

Faculty:

Andrew Beck, MD, PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Frederic Barr, MD, PhD, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

John Pfeifer, MD, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

Elizabeth Varga, MS, CGC, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH

 

Course Description:

Next-generation sequencing methods and multi-gene panels have entered clinical practice. Pathologists, as directors of molecular pathology laboratories, are already playing a leading role in applying genomic technology to patient care. Regardless of your planned specialty, genomic pathology will become an important part of your career as a pathologist. Using a case-based, interactive small-group approach, workshop participants will learn principles related to the development of genomic assays and interpretation of results. The workshop will also include practical hands-on instruction with the use of online genomic pathology tools.

The workshop was developed and will be led by members of the Training Resident in Genomics (TRIG) Working Group. Established in 2010, this group made up of experts in molecular pathology, medical education, and genetic counseling was formed to provide genomic pathology educational resources.

The workshop will utilize a team-based learning approach. While there will be short lectures at the beginning and end of each session, the majority of learning will take place in small resident teams with faculty support.

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Determine the clinical significance of genetic variants, using online tools

•Describe the benefits and limitations of integrative genomic analyses.

•Describe the reporting issues related to genomic analyses

 

9:00 AM       

Session 1: Single Gene Testing

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•List the factors that go into the determination of who is an appropriate candidate for cancer susceptibility genetic testing.

•Using online tools, determine the clinical significance of a variant related to cancer susceptibility genetic testing

 

10:45 AM     

Session 2: Prognostic Gene-Panel Testing

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Describe the role of pathologists in facilitating prognostic gene-panel testing.

•Compare utility of prognostic gene-panel testing to histologic methods.

•Interpret a prognostic gene panel report and consider important components to ensure appropriate interpretation by the ordering clinician.

•Describe the process of selecting genes for expression profiles for clinical use.

 

1:00 PM        

Session 3: Design of a Multigene Assay (Cancer Gene Panel)

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Describe different methods for detecting DNA variants (PCR vs. Sanger-based vs. NGS-based)

•Determine the appropriate methodology for a selected gene panel

•Describe the factors that determine the utility of inclusion of a specific gene in a multigene assay (in this case, a cancer gene panel).

 

2:45 PM        

Session 4: Whole Exome Sequencing

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

•Describe key aspects of informed consent for genomic analyses

•Describe the benefits and limitations of integrative genomic analyses for advanced cancer patients

•Describe the reporting issues related to unintended findings

•Use online tools to interpret the clinical significance of genomic data

 

NOTE:  Due to the high demand for this conference you must check in at the meeting location 10 minutes before the start of the class.  Unoccupied seats will be given to those not registered but waiting to attend.

 

Insider’s Tip:  There’s a reception following this conference for Pathologists in Training, USCAP Board Members,  and Ambassadors – but you must attend the Conference to obtain entry.   Held in CC 28 A the Reception runs from 6:00 to 7:30.

 

 

Short Courses

When:             Throughout Wednesday, March 5 through Friday, March  7

 

There are 59 short courses offered this year.  Investigate a wide scope of subspecialty areaswith

in-depth instruction.  Each course targets specific questions in pathology, reviews diagnostic challenges and details practical reviews and approaches.

 

Insider’s Tip:  These courses are very high yield sessions for pathologists-in-training!

 

The Long Course: Practical Points in Gastrointestinal Pathology – A Case Based Discussion of Common Dilemmas. 

 

When:             Wednesday, March 5

Time:              8:00 AM - 5:30 PM

Where:           CC Ballroom 20 D

 

Directed by Joel Greenson, MD and Laura Lamps, MD, the goal of this course is not to cover the entire spectrum of gastrointestinal pathology in a day, but rather to provide shorter, focused, case-based discussions of practical diagnostic dilemmas that virtually all practicing GI pathologists encounter. Presenters will use a “problem-based” approach, and each lecture will be based on a specific case or two. The lectures are intended for general surgical pathologists as well as those who primarily practice GI pathology. Topics will include both neoplastic and non-neoplastic entities, and both diagnostic criteria and clinicopathologic correlations will be discussed.

 

 

Special Course #1

 

 

“Clinical Application Of Next Generation Sequencing For The Management Of Patients With Solid Tumors”

 

Date:   Monday, March 3, 2014

Time:  8:00 AM–12:00 PM

Where: CC 30 A-D

 

In the modern practice of pathology, genomic sequencing has become a significant approach used in laboratory testing to personalize the treatment of both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Pathologists in training and in practice currently use genomic sequencing results on many of their patients with both common and rare malignancies. The traditional approaches to sequencing including Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing and allele-specific PCR are widely used to guide therapy for patients diagnosed with lung and colorectal cancers as well as for melanoma, sarcomas (GIST, others) and subtypes of leukemia and lymphoma. The traditional types of sequencing currently focus on the hot spots of selected genes and evaluate them in a “one gene at a time” format, each gene requiring its own separate clinical sample for assessment. The massively parallel or next-generation (NGS) approach to genomic sequencing, including whole exome (WES) and whole genome (WGS) sequencing has a variety of advantages over the traditional methods including the ability to sequence large numbers of genes (100’s to 1,000’s) all in one test and the ability to detect all classes of genomic alterations (i.e. base substitutions, small insertions and deletions, copy number alterations and rearrangements (fusions) in known cancer related genes with a single test.  This approach is much more comprehensive and can identify more targeted treatment options than the hot spot assays leveraging other technologies currently offered by many pathology laboratories. However, there are major demands in expertise and infrastructure required to apply NGS to the bedside of the cancer patient. In order to obtain the high sensitivity and specificity required for clinical diagnostics in routine clinical specimens that can be low purity, NGS must be optimized throughout all of the stages of the test procedure: sample procurement, pathology review for tumor adequacy, DNA extraction, DNA library construction, DNA sequence alteration detection, and data interpretation and reporting. Extensive computational expertise is required to interpret NGS data for clinical use, and a deep knowledge of cancer medicine and cancer biology is required to generate useful so-called “actionable” reports to clinicians.

 

This half-day course is designed to familiarize the registrant with both the technical aspects and clinical applications of NGS for the solid tumor cancer patient. The first section of the course is organized into a didactic series of short lectures given by the course instructors to highlight the history of clinical DNA sequencing on cancer specimens focused on the search for potential therapy targets for patients with relapsed and refractory disease. The technical section will emphasize practical issues for pathologists including the types of samples that can be used, the quantity and proportion of tumor cells needed and the pre-analytic factors that can influence NGS test results. The remainder of the course will then convert to case analysis based on tumor type in a series of sections specifically devoted to lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, melanoma, salivary gland tumors, kidney cancer, sarcomas and hepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

 

Special Course #2

 

“Basic Principles in Cytology”

Date:               Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Time:              8:00 AM–5:00 PM

Where:           CC 30 A-D

 

Cytology has grown to play a major role in tumor diagnosis. Surgical pathologists who may have had limited or no specialized training in cytology, are increasingly asked to render more definitive diagnoses based on small cytological samples, and/or provide immediate interpretations for radiology-guided FNA’s.

 

This special course emphasizes the essentials and basics of diagnostic cytology, and is intended for surgical pathologists who wish to be introduced or re-introduced to the discipline of cytology, or those who are interested in a “refresher” in general basic cytology. This course is also ideal for residents in training, and those preparing for boards or in-service exams. The faculty is made up of experts in the field, who will cover the most commonly encountered specimen types, including gynecologic, exfoliative, and FNA cytology. They will present detailed diagnostic criteria, adequacy requirements, differential diagnosis, and histopathologic correlation. Potential pitfalls, as well as the value of ancillary studies, including immunohistochemistry and molecular testing, will be discussed when relevant. There will be an ample opportunity for questions and audience participation. This course may also serve as an introduction to other cytology workshops or courses, which often tend to be of an advanced level, and more geared towards pathologists with strong cytology background.

 

The goals of this special course are for the participants to become less intimidated by cytologic samples, and more confidently diagnose commonly encountered lesions, and recognize potential limitations and pitfalls. All registrants will receive a detailed text syllabus, in addition to the PowerPoint lectures and images.

 

Fellowship Fair

 

Date:               Sunday, March 2                

Time:              5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Where:           CC 30 A - E

 

Looking for a fellowship?  Here’s an opportunity to speak with representatives over 40 leading institutions about fellowships ranging from Anatomic Pathology to Virology!

 

Insiders Tip:  Be sure to check out the Fellowship posters as you enter.  They will enable you to quickly find the location of the institution or type of fellowship that you seek.

 

 

 

Awards Ceremony – Pathologists-in-training Awards

When:             Tuesday, March 4

Time:              4:00 PM – 4:45 PM

Where:           CC Ballroom 20 A-D

 

The winners of the Stowell-Orbison Award and the Surgical and Autopsy Pathology Awards are two of five awards for pathologists-in-training that will be announced.  We’ll also honor others with the prestigious USCAP Leadership Awards during the Awards Ceremony.

 

Receptions

 

Pathologist in Training Reception:

Date:               Sunday, March 2

Time:              6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Where:           CC 28 A

 

You won’t want to miss this!  Here’s a great way to meet the USCAP Ambassadors, Councilors, Speakers and other conference VIP’s.  Be sure to attend this event to rub elbows with pathology leaders from around the globe. 

 

Insiders’ tip:  You must attend the Resident’s Workshop beforehand for entry to the reception

 

 

 

The USCAP Reception, “Party for a Passion”, honoring the USCAP Foundation

Date:               Tuesday, March 4

Time:              6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Where:           Hilton Bayfront Sapphire Ballroom

 

Insiders Tip:  All of the conference attendees will be here.  Don’t miss this!

 

 

Housestaff Hospitality Room

 

CC 28 C - E

7:00AM - 3:00 PM, Monday - Tuesday

 

Continental breakfast (7:00 - 8:00 AM) and a light buffet lunch (12:00 - 1:00 PM.) for Housestaff only will be available on a first-come first-served basis (food will not be replenished). Many distinguished pathologists have agreed to be available in the Housestaff Hospitality Room at these times.  This is a great opportunity to meet renowned pathologists and talk with them on a one to one basis.  They will be pleased to chat informally with housestaff regarding career choices or other pathology-related issues. 

 

Our Residency Advisory Committee and Membership Committee have recommended that we give you the opportunity for a more focused experience during the breakfast and lunch hours listed below.  Therefore, we will have topic-related round-table discussions available to cover topics relating to Pathology training issues to include Boards and MOC; preparing for success in academic practice; preparing for success in private practice; sub-specialty practice/fellowship advice.   

 

The room will only be staffed at the times listed below, but will remain open all day if you want a quiet place to relax and regroup.  Coffee and soft drinks will be available throughout the day. 

 

A RED DOT on your name tag will identify you as a Housestaff participant and you must show your name tag to be admitted to this room.  

 

SCHEDULE FOR HOSPITALITY ROOM

 

Monday, March 3rd

 

Breakfast - 7:00 - 8:00 AM:    

Drs. Elizabeth Morgan, Laura Collins, Miguel Sanchez, Celeste Powers, John Sinard, Paul Wakely, Suzanne Powell

 

Lunch - 12:00 - 1:00 PM:

Drs. Jeffrey Myers, Ashley Cimino-Mathews, Steven Billings, Adam Bagg, Alexander Lazar, Christina Isacson,

           

Tuesday, March 4th 

 

Breakfast - 7:00 - 8:00 AM:

Drs. Linda D. Ferrell, Rhonda Yantiss, Paul Wakely, L. Walden Browne, Robert Soslow, Daniel Arber, Scott Kilpatrick           

 

Lunch - 12:00 - 1:00 PM:

Drs. Jennifer Hunt, John Goldblum, Jeffrey Myers, Oyedele Adeyi, Christina Isacson

           

Others will drop by from time to time.