USCAP Honors

Dr. L. Clarke, Jr. and Elaine F. Stout Award
YearAwardee
2018Arnulf H. Koeppen
2017Natalia Rush
2016Nikhil Sangle
2015Ming Jin

The Dr. L. Clarke, Jr. and Elaine F. Stout Award was established in 2015 by the generous support of Dr. L. Clarke, Jr. and Elaine F. Stout. This award will ensure that pathologists endeavoring to resolve scientific medical problems by studying their anatomic features are supported and appreciated in perpetuity. The Stout Award will provide recognition and an award of $3,000 to an individual for the best English language peer-reviewed publication in the previous calendar year, which resolved scientific medical problems by studying their anatomic features.

To apply for the Stout Award, applicants must complete the application form available on the USCAP website and electronically submit the application form along with a reprint of the publication to the USCAP Foundation.

Applicants must be the first author of the publication. The Academy does not sponsor travel or hotel accommodations for this award.

The selection is made by the Stout Award Committee.

Application deadline: Thursday, October 11, 2018

Most-Recent Awardee

Arnulf H. Koeppen, M.D.

Arnulf H. Koeppen, M.D., graduated from the University of Göttingen (Germany) School of Medicine in 1963 and received his postgraduate training in neurology at Montefiore Hospital, New York City, New York and hospitals affiliated with Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois. He trained in neuropathology at the end of his neurology residency under the guidance of the late Dr. Kevin D. Barron at the Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in Hines, Illinois, and Albany, New York. Since his board certifications in neurology (1970) and neuropathology (1980), he has practiced both specialties and continues to do so after achieving the status of professor-emeritus at Albany Medical College. Dr. Koeppen first submitted scientific manuscripts while he was a neurology resident in Chicago. One of his articles concerned the correlation of subnormal body temperatures in Wernicke-Korsakoff disease with selective destruction of the posterior hypothalamus. His bibliography has since grown to 115 articles and book chapters.

Over his long career, he achieved funding for his research in neurochemistry and neuropathology from the Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, New York State Department of Health, American Heart Association, and Paraplegic Veterans of America. In 1973, he began to study the pathology of the hereditary ataxias. With support by National Ataxia Foundation and Friedreich’s Ataxia Research Alliance, he established a nationwide tissue donation program that supports his research and that of other investigators. Currently, his research focus is on Friedreich ataxia, the most common autosomal recessive hereditary ataxia.

His laboratory is located at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Albany, New York. Following the path of his late mentor in neuropathology, he continues to teach medical students and residents by stressing the importance of clinicoanatomic correlation in their understanding of diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

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