2017 Annual Meeting

Tumor Immunology: Implications for TNM Staging and Therapeutics

Room CC 221, March 6 2017, 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Description

Tumor Immunology: Implications for TNM Staging and Therapeutics
Monday, March 6, 2017
1:00 PM 5:00 PM
CC 221

Session Credits: CME and SAMs

Course Directors: Janis M. Taube, MD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Robert A. Anders, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Course Description:
The recent success of immune based cancer therapy is changing the practice of pathology. In order to prepare practicing pathologists this course will explain the current and future approach to evaluating patient specimens. This course will specifically address TNM-Immune staging and the emerging use of surgical pathology specimens for immune-based assays, including immunologic biomarkers for therapeutic selection and monitoring. Upon conclusion of the course, participants will be able to address questions they receive from treating physicians, oncologists and patients regarding predictive and prognostic immune biomarkers, histologic features of adverse immune reactions and evaluation PD-L1 immunohistochemistry.

Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Summarize how the activity of checkpoint agents differs from that of more traditional therapeutics
  • Summarize the latest concepts regarding the immune contexture of malignant neoplasms
  • Discuss the histologic features associated with adaptive immune resistance
  • Understand the limitations of PD-L1 evaluation
  • Identify additional markers and associated detection techniques that will likely be employed in future Immunopathology assays

Agenda

1:00 PM

Immune Checkpoints, Checkpoint Blockade Therapy, and Rational Patient Selection: An Overview
Janis M. Taube, MD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Summarize how the activity of checkpoint agents differs from that of more traditional therapies.
  • Describe possible immune-related side effects and the associated pathologic features from these agents.
  • Summarize recent FDA approvals for this class of therapeutics and the associated companion/complimentary diagnostics.

1:30 PM

The Immunoscore
Jerome Galon, MD, PhD, Cordeliers Research Center, Paris, France
Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Summarize how the Immunoscore performs compared to current TNM staging.
  • Understand how an Immunoscore is calculated.
  • Discuss the current status of the Immunoscore Task Force in validating this approach.

2:00 PM

PD-L1 IHC Assays: What Is the Difference and What Is Next
David Rimm, MD, PhD, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe differences and similarities of current chromogenic IHC testing methods for PD-L1
  • Understand the strengths and limitations of pathologist reading of these assays.
  • Describe methods beyond chromogenic IHC for measuring PD-L1 and other PD-L1 related parameters to predict response to PD-1 axis therapies.

2:30 PM

Coffee Break

3:00 PM

Results of Check Point Inhibition in Patients with Colon Cancer
Robert A. Anders, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Understand the importance of mismatch repair deficiency in colon cancer patients considering immune based chemotherapy.
  • Summarize the results of the anti-PD-1 clinical trial in colon patients.
  • Discuss the limitation of PD-L1 expression as a clinical predictive biomarker.

3:30 PM

The Breast Tumor Immune Microenvironment
Ashley Cimino-Mathews, MD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the components of the breast tumor immune microenvironment
  • Compare and contrast the tumor microenvironment of in situ and invasive breast carcinoma.
  • Discuss the features of the tumor microenvironment unique to special subtypes of invasive carcinoma.

4:00 PM

Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma: The Tumor Immune Microenvironment
Lynette M. Sholl, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Identify components of the NSCLC tumor immune microenvironment
  • Compare and contrast treatment indications and PD-L1 assay strategies for lung squamous cell carcinoma vs. adenocarcinoma
  • Discuss potential immune cell and tumor biomarkers beyond PD-L1 and their potential relationship to therapeutic outcomes

Meetings

home-circle-inset-1
view more